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A new industry-sponsored study on brain tumour risks in children who use mobilephones was presented to the media in July 2011. The press-release claimed that theresults were ”reassuring” whereas the study itself indicated an increased risk. Apart fromplaying down the results, there is evidence that the scientists also manipulated theresearch in order to underestimate the risks, especially of cordless phones.

The CEFALO study on the possible link between brain tumours and mobile phone use amongchildren showed an increased risk for children and adolescents who used a mobile phoneregularly.
1. Cefalo indicates in fact significantly increased risks, and the risks increase withincreased use,
says the Swedish oncologist and epidemiologist Lennart Hardell one of theexperts who participated in the recent WHO evaluation on mobile phone radiation and cancer.The increased risks of which some were statistically significant are mentioned neither by theCefalo scientistsMartin RöösliandMaria Feychting, nor by the Journal of the National CancerInstitute (JNCI

Their press-releases give reassuring messages as if no risk had been observed.
– Results are reassuring because they are non-significant and thus are compatible with chance
,states for example Martin Röösli

2. This interpretation of non-significant results differs fromnormal, straightforward presentations like the one a Norwegian Cefalo researcher put forwardin 2005: ”
We found an elevated risk for residential exposure to magnetic fields and braintumours, although the risk was not significant”.

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